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The Northwest Bronx Food Justice Project is sponsored by RSS and funded in part by the Bon Secours Mercy Health Foundation. In partnership with Kingsbridge Heights Community Center, Outer Seed Shadow, St. Stephens United Methodist Church, Marble Hill Community Center and the Schervier Apartments

Coalition Partners Kingsbridge Heights Community Center and St. Stephens United Methodist Church collaborate to get emergency food out to the community. 

Where Food Justice is Justice

1 out of 4
Households in the Northwest Bronx are Food Insecure

This is unacceptable. The NW Bronx Food Access Project is made up of a coalition of local community organizations and residents of Riverdale, Kingsbridge, and Marble Hill. Our mission is to take active, targeted steps to improve our community's health and well-being by addressing nutrition literacy and the impact of food insecurity and limited access to affordable and fresh food. 

The Northwest area of the Bronx needs more established food pantries. To accomplish this we are focusing on getting:

  • Consistent food sponsorship
  • Space to store large deliveries
  • Large refrigerated storage to handle larger quantities of perishable foods including fresh and healthy options for the community

What We are Doing in the Community

The NW Bronx Food Justice Project has worked tirelessly with multiple community partners to meet the needs of the neighborhood as the number of people struggling to get food has increased since the pandemic.

  • Setting Up an Emergency Food Pantry - Since this March, an emergency food pantry was organized at St. Stephens United Methodist Church on 228th St. that now serves shelf-stable and fresh produce to 200 people Monday and Wednesday mornings in the Marble Hill area.
  • Getting Food:  Organizing with and building on connections with KHCC, NYC Get Food, Catholic Charities and the local CSA  we have been able to get supplemental food that is distributed to both St. Stephens and KHCC's food pantry. 
  • Nutritional Outreach:  Our nutritionist is outreaching across the Northwest Bronx. Through a combination of online events, a weekly "Meet the Nutritionist" table and youtube videos the Food Justice Project is out in the community.

Upcoming Events

Meet Our Nutritionist - Deborah Johnson

Every Wednesday at 11 AM
Meet Our Nutritionist - Deborah Johnson

NW Bronx Food Justice Project Nutritionist Deborah Johnson is out in the Community every Wednesday morning to speak with community members one-on-one, answer nutrition questions, and hand out informational fliers to take home. You will find her across the street from St. Stephens Church on the corner of 228th St. and Marble Hill Ave.

Eating Seasonally for Your Health

Thursday, August 20, 2020
11:00 am12:00 pm
Eating Seasonally for Your Health

Following up on the wonderful presentation on salads Deborah and Barbara are here again. This time the focus is on eating seasonally for your health!

It's no secret that the most succulent tasting fruits and vegetables are those that are in season. Join Nutritionist Deborah Johnson as she prepares a simple dish using seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Deborah is a Plant-based Nutritionist who holds a Master of Science degree in Nutrition. As a Nutritionist, Deborah is committed to the journey of helping people make lasting changes by adopting healthy habits for life, at their respective levels of readiness. In addition to her role as Community Health Nutritionist for the North West Bronx Food Justice Project, Deborah teaches Nutrition Education to middle schoolers in Harlem NY.

Meet Our Nutritionist - Deborah Johnson

Every Wednesday at 11 AM
Meet Our Nutritionist - Deborah Johnson

NW Bronx Food Justice Project Nutritionist Deborah Johnson is out in the Community every Wednesday morning to speak with community members one-on-one, answer nutrition questions, and hand out informational fliers to take home. You will find her across the street from St. Stephens Church on the corner of 228th St. and Marble Hill Ave.


How could hunger soar if poverty does not? The possible explanations shed light on how people are faring in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. And they bear on the deadlocked policy debate between Congress and the Trump administration over whether to continue expanded jobless benefits, which expire in several days.


Resources

Food Resources in the Northwest Bronx

NYC Food Delivery Program -  click here to get information on food delivery
 

Grab-and-go mealsClick here to find a location near you

  • text "NYC FOOD" or "COMIDA" to 877-877.

KHCC Food Pantry at Kingsbridge Heights Community Center - 3101 Kingsbridge Terrace at Summit Place. For more information go to:

RAIN - Cucina Dolores provides free meals throughout the Bronx: Click here to find out more about food delivery for homebound seniors (over 60) 

  • 2call RAIN directly at 718-892-5520.

Imperfect Food has created the Reduced Cost Box Program during the COVID crisis for people who meet the income qualifications for SNAP . 

  • Click here to find out more about getting reduced cost fresh fruits and vegetables. 
  • Free delivery to seniors who qualify. 

Online nutrition education and cooking classes: offered by Community Health and SNAP-Ed program for youth, adults, and older adults.

  • Email Shamika Reddon at sreddon@bronxworks.org for more information

Food Justice: A Growing Movement

Food Justice is the right of all people to have access to healthy food that is local, affordable and culturally appropriate.Food Justice: A Growing Movement (2006) explores the concept and implementation of Food Justice on the local level in several communities in California.... Creative Commons copyright 2006, Ribs and Tux productions (Martina Brimmer and Zora Tucker)

 


Coronavirus Pandemic Is Making America’s Food Deserts Worse

Parts of the NW Bronx is considered a food desert. Food deserts, or neighborhoods where residents have limited access to a grocery store, exist in every U.S. state. The coronavirus pandemic is making that scarcity even worse.

In this video NBC News’ Blayne Alexander talks to Americans trying to bring fresh fruits and vegetables to their communities.»


Hunger and Health are deeply connected.

When people don’t have enough food or have to choose inexpensive foods with low-nutritional value, it can seriously impact their health. Learn how hunger can affect the daily lives of 1 in 9 Americans:

For further information go to Feeding America https://www.feedingamerica.org/hunger-in-america/impact-of-hunger/hunger-and-nutrition


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